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Tile Removal

Tile Countertop Replacement

Many of our customers come to our showroom wanting to replace their existing tile countertops. They are simply tired of cleaning the grout. Though removing the tile countertops is necessary, replacing the cabinets is not an option.

“Is this possible”, they ask?

Of course, it is possible! We do replacement countertops all the time.

Because maintenance is the number one reason for replacement, we begin by introducing our customers to either solid surface or quartz surfacing material. Both products offer easy maintenance and virtually endless design possibilities.

Removing a tile countertop can be a daunting task. Following these basic steps can make the process as pain free as possible.

THE MESS

Removing tile is a messy job. But there are certainly steps that can be taken, including covering the floors with tarps, using plastic to mask off the area of work, dust collection on tools, etc. that helps to keep the mess to a minimum.

Zip Walls are also a fantastic way to contain any stray dust. Zip Walls are temporary, plastic walls that go from floor to ceiling, limiting the migration of dust to adjacent rooms. Be sure to ask your fabricator how they protect the area that they will be working in.

THE DAMAGE

Yes, absolutely there will be damage to walls and cabinets when tile is removed. Typically, tile is set in a mortar base and most tile installers use the large 2’’ drop edge pieces where there are finished edges on countertops.

When that tile and mortar is removed you will typically find that there will be some damage, or at least fading of the stain on the front of the cabinets. This can certainly be remedied by asking your countertop fabricator to extend your edge height from the typical 1 ½’’ to a 2 – 2 ½’’ height to cover the damage. Keep in mind, there is additional cost involved in taller edges, but that cost would certainly be much less expensive than refinishing or re-facing existing cabinets.

If you have tile extending up the wall for backsplash, the removal of that tile will most certainly damage the drywall or plaster behind it. Again, there is no reason to panic. A quality countertop fabricator should be able to create a backsplash with the same material you have chosen for your countertop to cover up any damage to the wall. In fact, you can even ask your installer to go up a ¼’’ – ½’’ or so past what is the existing height of your current backsplash to cover up any old paint or grout lines.

CONCLUSION

When your tile countertops are past the point of repair, don’t let the tile removal process overwhelm you. With the right tools and equipment, removal of the existing tile countertop will be as smooth as selecting the new counter.