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Calacatta Neolith Porcelain Vanity Countertop

Do Porcelain Countertops Chip?

 

Neolith Calacatta Countertop with Waterfall Edge

Neolith Calacatta Countertop

Porcelain countertops are a popular choice for many homeowners. They are sleek and stylish, and they come in a variety of colors and finishes. But one question that many people ask is whether porcelain countertops chip easily.

Porcelain is a strong and durable material, so it is unlikely that your countertop will chip if you use it normally. However, porcelain can be susceptible to chipping if it is hit hard enough or if it experiences a lot of wear and tear. The best way to avoid chipping is to be careful with your porcelain countertop and to avoid using it for tasks that could damage it.

If you are worried about porcelain countertops chipping, you can always ask your contractor or countertop company for advice. They will be able to tell you more about how to care for your porcelain countertop and how to avoid damaging it. With a little bit of care, your porcelain countertop should last for many years.

Repairability:

If your countertop does chip, you will need to have it repaired by a professional. Depending on the size and location of the chip, this can be a simple repair. However, large, or deep chips may require more extensive repairs and they may be noticeable.

Conclusion:

Thanks for reading! We hope this blog post has answered all of your questions about porcelain countertops and their susceptibility to chipping. If you have any further questions or would like more information, please don’t hesitate to call or text today. Our team is here to help you make the best decision possible when it comes to choosing your next countertop material. Have a great day!

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Cadenza - Metro Quartz Countertop

Are Porcelain Countertops Cheaper than Quartz?

Cadenza - Metro Quartz Countertop

Cadenza – Metro Quartz Countertop

Are porcelain countertops cheaper than quartz? This is a question that many homeowners are asking these days. The answer, however, is no – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than quartz.

So why would someone choose to install porcelain countertops in their home instead of quartz? There are a few reasons: durability, aesthetics, and price. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors.

Durability

Porcelain is an extraordinarily strong and durable material. It is resistant to scratches, staining, and heat. This makes it an ideal choice for areas that see a lot of use, such as kitchens, BBQ Islands, and bathrooms.

Quartz on the other hand is scratch and stain resistant but is NOT resistant to staining. Quartz countertops require a sealer to help protect from staining and water absorption.

Aesthetics

Porcelain countertops come in a wide variety of colors and styles. This gives homeowners the ability to create the perfect look for their home. quartz tends to come in medium to dark colors and lack the veining that is so populate today.

Price

The cost of porcelain countertops is higher since they take longer to make and install. During the fabrication process, porcelain is a difficult material to work with. To guarantee beautiful edges, tight seams, and precise fit and finish, special methods must be employed.

Quartz costs have decreased in recent years since they are so many manufacturers, resulting in a cheaper slab.

While porcelain is not cheaper than quartz, they can be more desirable because of the more popular designs and colors. Also, porcelain countertops are not affected by heat or UV light making them more durable.

Conclusion

So, there you have it – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than quartz. But they may be the right choice for you, depending on your needs and preferences. Talk to a countertop specialist today to learn more about porcelain and whether they are right for your home.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Dekton Porcelain Countertop - Color: Curo

Are Porcelain Countertops Cheaper Than Granite?

Dekton Porcelain Countertop - Color: Curo

Dekton Porcelain Countertop – Color: Curo

Are porcelain countertops cheaper than granite? This is a question that many homeowners are asking these days. The answer, however, is no – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than granite.

So why would someone choose to install porcelain countertops in their home instead of granite? There are a few reasons: durability, aesthetics, and price. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors.

Durability

Porcelain is an extraordinarily strong and durable material. It is resistant to scratches, staining, and heat. This makes it an ideal choice for areas that see a lot of use, such as kitchens, BBQ Islands, and bathrooms.

Granite on the other hand is scratch and stain resistant but is NOT resistant to staining. Granite countertops require a sealer to help protect from staining and water absorption.

Aesthetics

Porcelain countertops come in a wide variety of colors and styles. This gives homeowners the ability to create the perfect look for their home. Granite tends to come in medium to dark colors and lack the veining that is so populate today.

Price

The cost of porcelain countertops is higher since they take longer to make and install. During the fabrication process, porcelain is a difficult material to work with. To guarantee beautiful edges, tight seams, and precise fit and finish, special methods must be employed.

Granite costs have decreased in recent years since they are no longer as popular, resulting in a cheaper slab.

While porcelain is not cheaper than granite, they can be more desirable because of the more popular designs and colors. Also, porcelain countertops do not ever need a sealer keeping them looking beautiful for years to come.

Conclusion

So, there you have it – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than granite. But they may be the right choice for you, depending on your needs and preferences. Talk to a countertop specialist today to learn more about porcelain and whether they are right for your home.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

MSI Stile Porcelain Countertop

Porcelain Countertop Cost: What You Need to Know

If you are looking for a new countertop, you may be interested in porcelain. But what are porcelain countertops? What factors into their cost? How much do they cost? In this blog post, we will explore porcelain countertop cost.

What are porcelain slab countertops?

Porcelain is made of a mineral called kaolinite. This mineral is mixed with other materials like feldspar, metal oxides, and silica to make porcelain. Porcelain often looks like other materials; for example, some companies manufacture porcelain that looks like marble.

Simply put, porcelain slabs are giant tiles like what used to come in a standard 4″ x 4″ dimension.

Pros and Cons

Many people love porcelain because it is exceptionally durable and beautiful. Porcelain is also considered to be very stain resistant because it does not absorb liquids.

In terms of chipping and scratching, it can resist most damage, but it is still possible. Porcelain shines when it comes to heat and UV resistance. It will not distort when subjected to high temperatures, making it an excellent choice for outdoor use in direct sunlight.

Porcelain comes in a variety of designs, colors, and sizes. You can find porcelain that looks like wood or stone. Some porcelain is even made to look like fabric. The possibilities are endless with porcelain!

What do porcelain slab countertops cost?

Porcelain countertop cost from $100 to $150 per square foot. For comparison’s sake, quartz is usually $70 to $100 per square foot.

The higher cost is due to the complicated manufacturing process. Specialized blades and slow cutting speeds are required for cutting the material. Extra precaution must be taken throughout the fabrication process to guarantee a beautiful end result with sharp edges and seams.

If you’re in the market for a new countertop and are considering porcelain, be sure to give us a call. We can provide you with an estimate for installation as well as answer any questions you may have about this beautiful and durable material.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789  |  valerie.olivemill@gmail.com  |  Contractor’s License #823217

Porcelain Countertops Pros and Cons – 2022

Neolith Calacatta Countertop with Waterfall Edge

Neolith Calacatta Countertop with Waterfall Edge

Are Porcelain Countertops right for your home?

WHAT ARE PORCELAIN COUNTERTOPS?

Porcelain kitchen countertops are a man-made product made from clay. The clay called ‘China clay’ is mixed with other minerals to create the strength and durability of porcelain.

The combination of these materials is put into a kiln and fired at extremely high temperatures. This creates a dense, durable material resistant to stains, heat, UV rays, scratches, chips, and cracks.

During the manufacturing of porcelain countertops, pigmented glazes are added to create different patterns and colors on the porcelain slab. Porcelain can be either glazed or unglazed. However, glazing increases the durability of the slab by making it shiny and less porous (which means there is a decreased risk of staining).

DRAWBACK OF PORCELAIN COUNTERS

One downside to glazed porcelain is that the printing is only on the surface. This means that if it chips, you can see a different color on the inside. On the other hand, unglazed porcelain has the same color on both the surface and the interior of the slab.

PORCELAIN COLORS AND PATTERNS

Just like other countertops, porcelain countertops come in assorted colors and designs that look like natural materials, like marble, wood grain, or concrete. But remember that the pattern and color won’t be on the inside of the countertop since it’s applied only to the top surface during glazing.

PORCELAIN COUNTERTOP EDGES

Porcelain countertops are unique because of the printing on the surface. The patterns and colors are only on the top, so you can’t cut a rounded edge. Most people choose a simple square edge to keep the pattern and color.

PORCELAIN COUNTERTOP DURABILITY

Although porcelain slabs are durable, they are also lightweight and thin. The typical thickness for porcelain countertops is ¼ inch (6 mm) or ½ inch (12 mm). Porcelain slabs can also be made in large sizes, which is useful for covering an entire island without seams.

Once installed, however, porcelain is extremely hard and durable. Cracking is only a big issue during the handling, moving, and cutting of exceptionally large slabs.

What Are Porcelain Countertops – Pros and Cons?

What materials come to mind when you hear the term “toughest countertop”? Granite or quartz are candidates. Sure, granite and quartz are strong. People, on the other hand, but porcelain is one of the toughest.

Porcelain is stronger than granite and about as hard as quartz.

What are porcelain countertops anyway?

While different manufacturers may use different processes to make porcelain surfacing material, it is generally made from a mixture of inorganic raw materials. In a heat and pressure sintering process the ingredients merge forming a strong bond with very little porosity. Some manufacturers liken the process to the way metamorphic rock is created.

Porcelain slabs are coated with a colored glaze when they’re produced for use in countertops. This is to give them the look of natural stone or marble and add to their attractiveness.

Pros and Cons of Porcelain Countertops

Pros

  • Heat Endurance – One advantage of porcelain countertops are that they can handle extremely high temperatures without being damaged. You can place hot pots and pans on them without any problems.
  • Hardness – Porcelain is stronger than the hardest granite.
  • Scratch Resistant – Porcelain is scratch-resistant and does not usually suffer any harm during regular use. The material will not be harmed when knives or sliding pots and pans are dragged over the surface.
  • Non-Porous – In a nutshell, the material will not take on any water. Liquids will remain on the surface.
  • Stain Resistant – Because porcelain is non-porous it is highly stain resistant without the need to seal it.
  • UV Light Resistance – Material can be in direct sunlight and won’t fade or discolor.
  • Wide Range of Colors and Patterns – Colors range from whites to black in solids, patterns, and veins. The slabs are printed, allowing manufacturers endless design possibilities.
  • Large Format Size – 120″x60″ is a typical dimension. This allows for one piece island tops without seams.

Cons

  • Easy to Crack – Though porcelain is one of the most durable materials around, it can be quite brittle. If something heavy falls on it or if it’s subject to a sharp impact, it may crack.
  • Limited Edge Styles – Extremely limited choices are available due to the core of the material being different than the surface. A mitered edge is the best option.
  • Higher Price – Because of the complexity in producing and installing porcelain, it is more expensive than other materials. Fabrication can be twice as long.

As you can see, high-quality porcelain countertops are a versatile and durable product that gives you high performance and isn’t difficult to install. Since it’s stylish, resistant to daily wear and tear, and comes in assorted colors and patterns, it can be the perfect addition to your decor.

Though it has some disadvantages, overall, the pros outweigh the cons. And with proper planning and care, they can be the most fashionable and practical decision you can make when it comes to your kitchen.

Magnifica Porcelain Countertop

Most Popular Kitchen Countertop Materials

Bianco Venatino Quartzite from Arizona Tile

Bianco Venatino Quartzite from Arizona Tile

 

There are many types of countertops on the market for kitchens. The most common types are quartz, porcelain, quartzite, solid surface, granite, and marble. They all have their own pros and cons. For example, some materials are scratch resistant, while others can be scratched or marred easily. And some materials are more expensive than others.

Here are the most popular kitchen countertops materials.

Quartz

Quartz is a manufactured stone that contains as much as 93 percent quartz particles and other minerals, molded into slabs, and bound with resins, making it a type of engineered stone. These aren’t real quartz slabs quarried from the earth.

Quartz was designed as a more adaptable and better-performing substitute to granite and marble by firms such as DuPont and Cosentino. It is available in a wider range of colors than granite and has a nonporous surface that resists scratching and staining. Some types are convincing imitations of natural marble with comparable veining. Engineered quartz does not require annual sealing, unlike natural stone.

Porcelain

Porcelain is a type of ceramic with properties such as hardness, longevity, heat resistance, and color fastness. While porcelain may be used for kitchen countertops, there are certain drawbacks. There isn’t much depth in surface designs, so if a porcelain countertop is scratched, the pattern will be disrupted/damaged, and the fact that it only runs surface deep will be revealed. When compared to other more substantial-appearing materials like granite, marble, or quartz, porcelain counters are usually very thin.

Porcelain is scratch-resistant and has a long-life span. It is also resistant to heat and stains. Counters made of porcelain are available in assorted colors and designs. They’re also simple to maintain and keep clean.

Quartzite

Quartzite is metamorphic rock. It develops naturally when sandstone or chert with a high quartz content is subjected to tremendous heat and pressure. Quartzite, which usually has a quartz content of more than 90%, can reach 99%. It is heat and scratch resistant but is susceptible to staining.

Quartzite has a glassy sheen and, in some cases, resembles marble. Quartzite is one of the most popular countertop materials for its beautiful look.

Solid Surface

Solid-surface material, also known as Corian, Staron, HI-MACS and Avonite, is a man-made product consisting of a blend of acrylic particles and resins pressed into sheets and other forms. Solid surface countertops and sinks have been around for almost 50 years, but when they were first introduced, they were space-age alternatives to natural stone, which they sought to imitate.

Solid-surface material is stain scratch resistant. Keep heat away from solid surface as not to damage the surface. The main advantage is the ability to repair and refinish, along with a seamless appearance.

Granite

Granite has long been the go-to countertop material when there were no financial concerns to consider. Granites are elegant in a kitchen. When granite worktops are utilized, even tiny kitchens seem like luxury apartments.

Granite has long been an expensive material, although its expense has dropped as supplies have grown and engineered stone has become more common.

The material is resistant to heat and scratches. Granite surfaces require special attention because they are susceptible to staining.

Marble

Marble is a popular stone for kitchen countertops. Because no two pieces of marble are identical, each marble countertop is one-of-a-kind.

Marble has the advantage of looking beautiful and being exceptionally durable, but it may stain and scratch easily. Marble’s sensitivity to stains and scratches makes it a less desirable material for kitchens than granite or soapstone.

Quartz, Porcelain and Granite Countertops Seams – Top 10 Tips

Quartz Seam

Poor Seam Quality

Many homeowners are interested in quartz, porcelain, and granite countertops for their homes. Both types of countertops offer a durable, elegant finish that can last for many years with proper care.

However, one thing to consider when choosing between these two materials is the seams. Seams are where the countertop material is joined together, and they can be more visible on certain types of stone than others.

Here are our top tips for making your quartz or granite countertop seams as inconspicuous as possible.

  1. Realistic Expectations – Have realistic expectations of the material. Although a good seam should be inconspicuous, do not expect it to be invisible. A seam in granite and quartz countertops will always be something that you can both see and feel. (Seam quality in picture to right is unacceptable.)
  2. Color and Pattern – The color and pattern selected can make a difference in the appearance of the seam. Light colors (white, beige, light grays) with a solid or small pattern will have more conspicuous seams than a material with multiple colors and patterns.
  3. See a Sample – Be sure your fabricator shows you a sample of their seam quality. A fabricator should either have a showroom that you can go to and view a seam, or they should provide a list of past clients willing to let you come to their home and see the quality of work installed.
  4. Seam Location – There is some controversy about whether a seam should be put in the middle of a sink or cooktop cut out. Some fabricators feel the seam is more vulnerable to breakage in those areas. However, if you prefer to have a seam in one or both locations, ask your fabricator if the material can handle such a small seam.
  5. Seam Layout – Seam layouts should be done before cutting material. Your fabricator should know the length and width of your material and should determine the exact position prior to cutting. If you prefer, discuss the seam location when the fabricator is making the pattern (template) for your countertop. Be sure to be present while they are doing final field measurements, so you can discuss seam location.
  6. Epoxy Seams – Countertop deck seams should be bonded with an epoxy similar in color(s) to the granite / quartz material. Deck seams should not be bonded with silicone.
  7. “Industry Standards” – This is a fancy term used to say the seam is “Good Enough”. Industry standards recommend deck seams can be up to 1/16” wide with a +/- tolerance of 1/64”. Veteran fabricators work to achieve a much tighter fit.
  8. granite seam lippage

    Quartz Seam Lippage

    Lippage – A good seam should be level. Many times, fabricators encounter un-level cabinets, varied slab thickness, and bowed or warped material. This requires the fabricator to shim the countertops or modify the material to get a quality seam. Even minor amounts of lippage are noticeable and sometimes unavoidable due to permanent warp in the material.

  9. Final Positioning – When your fabricator installs your countertops, it’s not typical to have the seam fit perfectly the first time. Most fabricators will layout the tops and do a “dry fit” the first time, and then take the tops out of the house to make slight modifications. This may need to be done multiple times to achieve a great fit. This is normal, and you should not be alarmed.
  10. See It Yourself – Be sure to be present on the day your fabricator installs the countertops. If you have any concerns about the appearance of the seam, it can be addressed immediately before countertops have been permanently set in place.

Quartz, porcelain and granite countertops are a popular choice for many homeowners. When selecting a countertop, it is important to consider the seams. These are our top 10 tips to help you choose the best quartz or granite countertop for your home.

If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to call or text today. Our team would be happy to help you find the perfect countertop for your home.