Caesarstone Quartz Countertop

Quartz Countertops Cost

Quartz countertops are extremely popular these days, and given the several advantages associated with quartz countertops, the trend is set to continue. Quartz is preferred owing to its wide range of colors and patterns, ease of cleaning and maintenance, stain and scratch resistance, attractiveness, and durability.

Of course, when it comes to quartz countertops, price is a major factor to consider. Read on for a cost breakdown of quartz countertops.

Ceasarstone Statuario Nuvo

Ceasarstone Statuario Nuvo Quartz Countertop

How much do quartz countertops cost?

The average cost of quartz countertops ranges between $50 to over $150 per square foot. This cost is based on the type, countertop dimensions, edge profile, cut-outs required, and other specifications. It’s critical to get a quote for your unique project. Make sure all the necessary information is included, as well as a final price that includes fabrication, installation, and taxes.

The cost of the quartz slab and its fabrication and installation might differ by company. You’ll want to find a fabricator and installer that is competent in the technique. The finest material can be destroyed by poor craftsmanship. However, shoddy material will not improve with better fabrication and installation.

Three Factors That Can Affect the Price.
  1. The Manufacturer: Quartz countertops can vary in price depending on the manufacturer. Some producers, for example, cut corners and produce inexpensive wholesale quartz surfaces. While these countertops might save you money up front, investing in a reputable maker would be your best long-term investment.
  2. Colors and patterns: The more popular colors are typically more expensive. The cost of a quartz slab will also be increased by fancy patterns. Veins and strong patterns are generally more costly.
  3. The quality: Quartz slabs come in a variety of grades and qualities. Quartz slab hardness and quality varies greatly. Harder quartz slabs are better, but they aren’t always immediately obvious just by looking. We only sell high-quality products from reputable manufacturers. We don’t feel right about selling quartz produced by off-brand name manufacturers. Quartz countertops with a higher grade are less vulnerable to stains, scratches, and cracks. They are also more long-lasting and emit fewer volatile organic compounds (VOCs).
Additional Items That Can Affect the Price
  • Leveling – Cabinets must be level. Unlevel cabinets will need to be levelled prior to the installation of the countertops.
  • Demo – Old countertops need to be removed. This will include the removal and disposal of the existing countertop.
  • Cutouts – Sink, Cooktop and Electrical outlets will typically cost extra but should be factored into the price. Almost every top has a cutout.
  • Support – Overhang support is critical at peninsulas and island tops with seating. Small overhangs will not need additional support.
  • Subtops – Cabinet makers will typically include a subtop. If you do not have an existing subtop, a 5/8″ thick subtop will need to be installed prior to the countertop installation.
  • Backsplash – Using quartz for your backsplash will cost a little extra because of the additional material and the fabrication labor to polish the top edge.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Metro Quartz Birchwood

What are the Problems with Quartz Countertops? – 6 Most Common Problems

Possible Problems with Quartz Countertops

Let’s touch on a few potential quartz common problems. But they shouldn’t stop you from choosing quartz. Instead, we hope they’ll help you know what to ask and how to plan when selecting & installing quartz.

Quartz Countertops Problems

 

1. Extreme Heat Can be Damaging

While quartz is heat resistant, it can be damaged by sudden changes in temperature. So, if you’re placing hot pans on your countertops, use a trivet or hot pad to protect them.

2. Staining Can be an Issue

Quartz is non-porous and resists most stains, but it’s not impervious. If a spill isn’t cleaned up quickly, it can cause staining. Certain foods and drinks can also cause staining, so it’s important to wipe up any spills as soon as they happen.

While quartz is stain resistant, it’s not impervious to chemicals. Harsh chemicals can damage the finish of your countertops. When cleaning your countertops, use a mild soap and water solution. Avoid using harsh cleaners or any cleaner that contains bleach.

Because quartz countertop material is non-porous, no sealing is required.

3. Quartz is Not Scratch Proof

While quartz is harder than granite, it can still be scratched. To avoid scratches, use cutting boards and avoid placing anything too heavy on your countertops.

4 . Sun U/V Rays Can Also be Damaging

While quartz is resistant to heat, it can be damaged by exposure to direct sunlight or UV rays. Over time, this exposure can cause the color of your countertops to fade. If you have quartz countertops in an area that gets a lot of sun, you may want to consider using window treatments to help protect them.

5. Seams Can be Visible

Because quartz is a man-made material, it typically comes in large slabs. These slabs are then cut to size and installed on your countertops. The seams where the quartz pieces come together can be visible, especially if the countertop is in an area where there’s a lot of light.

Poor edge seams are one of the most frequent quartz countertop flaws. Your countertop will have a lot of edge seams. A good edge seam, whether laminated or mitered, adds to the beauty of the counter. If the edge seam is very noticeable, it can be distracting.

6. Visible Caulk Lines

In some cases, caulking is used to fill the gaps between the quartz pieces. This can result in visible caulk lines, which some people may find unappealing. Caulk lines should be inconspicuous; however, it is dependent on the color of the caulk and the material along with the expertise of the installer.

Conclusion

Quartz countertops are a beautiful and durable option for your home. But like any material, there are some potential problems that you should be aware of. Extreme heat can damage quartz, so use hot pads or trivets when placing hot pans on your countertop. Staining can also be an issue, so wipe up spills as soon as they happen. Quartz is also not scratch proof, so use cutting boards and avoid placing anything too heavy on your countertop. Sunlight or UV rays can also damage quartz over time, so you may want to use window treatments to help protect your countertops. Finally, seams can be visible with quartz countertops, so keep this in mind when choosing your countertop material.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Can Corian Solid Surface Countertops Burn?


Can Corian Solid Surface Countertops Burn?

No, Corian will not burn or catch fire. However, a discolored burn mark will be left if you allow the hot item to cool on the countertop after cooking.

To give another example, Corian Solid Surface will not catch fire, but most people aren’t aware of that when they inquire about whether it will burn. They’re wondering whether hot pots and pans can be placed directly on the countertop without harming it.

You cannot use Corian Solid Surface as a hot plate. The material will fade, and while a repair might be attempted, it is unlikely to meet expectations.

It is always a good idea to use a hot pad or place pots and pans on the stove top.

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Unique Calacatta - Metro Quartz Countertop

Are Waterfall Countertops Out of Style in 2022?

Waterfall countertops were all the rage a few years ago, but are they still popular in 2022? Let’s look at some of the pros and cons of this type of countertop to find out.

1. What are waterfall countertops and what do they look like? Waterfall edges are created by continuing the countertop material down the end of cabinet to the floor. This gives the countertop an appearance that resembles a waterfall.

2. What are the benefits of having waterfall countertops in your home? It adds a dramatic element of luxury and can make a small kitchen appear larger. Waterfalls are a fantastic way to highlight the color and pattern. They may be viewed from various perspectives than the counter, which adds to the appeal of the material.

3. Are waterfall countertops out of style now? In recent years, the popularity of waterfall countertops has declined but not due to them being out of style. Due to the higher cost of material, many homeowners have opted out of having them installed in their home.

4. Are waterfall edges more expensive? Yes, waterfall countertops are typically more expensive to install than other types of countertops. This is due in part to the extra materials needed and the additional labor involved in creating the waterfall edge.

5. If you’re thinking about getting waterfall countertops for your home, what are some things you should keep in mind before making a final decision?

    • They are stylish and elegant and can add a touch of luxury to your kitchen.
    • They can be more expensive than other types of countertops.
    • They can be difficult to install, so you may need to hire a professional.
    • They may be out of style in a few years, so you should weigh the pros and cons.

Are waterfall countertops still popular in 2022? That’s a tough question to answer, as trends tend to come and go. However, there are several benefits to having this type of countertop in your home that may make it worth considering for your next kitchen remodel project.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Calacatta Neolith Porcelain Vanity Countertop

Do Porcelain Countertops Chip?

 

Neolith Calacatta Countertop with Waterfall Edge

Neolith Calacatta Countertop

Porcelain countertops are a popular choice for many homeowners. They are sleek and stylish, and they come in a variety of colors and finishes. But one question that many people ask is whether porcelain countertops chip easily.

Porcelain is a strong and durable material, so it is unlikely that your countertop will chip if you use it normally. However, porcelain can be susceptible to chipping if it is hit hard enough or if it experiences a lot of wear and tear. The best way to avoid chipping is to be careful with your porcelain countertop and to avoid using it for tasks that could damage it.

If you are worried about porcelain countertops chipping, you can always ask your contractor or countertop company for advice. They will be able to tell you more about how to care for your porcelain countertop and how to avoid damaging it. With a little bit of care, your porcelain countertop should last for many years.

Repairability:

If your countertop does chip, you will need to have it repaired by a professional. Depending on the size and location of the chip, this can be a simple repair. However, large, or deep chips may require more extensive repairs and they may be noticeable.

Conclusion:

Thanks for reading! We hope this blog post has answered all of your questions about porcelain countertops and their susceptibility to chipping. If you have any further questions or would like more information, please don’t hesitate to call or text today. Our team is here to help you make the best decision possible when it comes to choosing your next countertop material. Have a great day!

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Cadenza - Metro Quartz Countertop

Are Porcelain Countertops Cheaper than Quartz?

Cadenza - Metro Quartz Countertop

Cadenza – Metro Quartz Countertop

Are porcelain countertops cheaper than quartz? This is a question that many homeowners are asking these days. The answer, however, is no – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than quartz.

So why would someone choose to install porcelain countertops in their home instead of quartz? There are a few reasons: durability, aesthetics, and price. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors.

Durability

Porcelain is an extraordinarily strong and durable material. It is resistant to scratches, staining, and heat. This makes it an ideal choice for areas that see a lot of use, such as kitchens, BBQ Islands, and bathrooms.

Quartz on the other hand is scratch and stain resistant but is NOT resistant to staining. Quartz countertops require a sealer to help protect from staining and water absorption.

Aesthetics

Porcelain countertops come in a wide variety of colors and styles. This gives homeowners the ability to create the perfect look for their home. quartz tends to come in medium to dark colors and lack the veining that is so populate today.

Price

The cost of porcelain countertops is higher since they take longer to make and install. During the fabrication process, porcelain is a difficult material to work with. To guarantee beautiful edges, tight seams, and precise fit and finish, special methods must be employed.

Quartz costs have decreased in recent years since they are so many manufacturers, resulting in a cheaper slab.

While porcelain is not cheaper than quartz, they can be more desirable because of the more popular designs and colors. Also, porcelain countertops are not affected by heat or UV light making them more durable.

Conclusion

So, there you have it – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than quartz. But they may be the right choice for you, depending on your needs and preferences. Talk to a countertop specialist today to learn more about porcelain and whether they are right for your home.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

Dekton Porcelain Countertop - Color: Curo

Are Porcelain Countertops Cheaper Than Granite?

Dekton Porcelain Countertop - Color: Curo

Dekton Porcelain Countertop – Color: Curo

Are porcelain countertops cheaper than granite? This is a question that many homeowners are asking these days. The answer, however, is no – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than granite.

So why would someone choose to install porcelain countertops in their home instead of granite? There are a few reasons: durability, aesthetics, and price. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors.

Durability

Porcelain is an extraordinarily strong and durable material. It is resistant to scratches, staining, and heat. This makes it an ideal choice for areas that see a lot of use, such as kitchens, BBQ Islands, and bathrooms.

Granite on the other hand is scratch and stain resistant but is NOT resistant to staining. Granite countertops require a sealer to help protect from staining and water absorption.

Aesthetics

Porcelain countertops come in a wide variety of colors and styles. This gives homeowners the ability to create the perfect look for their home. Granite tends to come in medium to dark colors and lack the veining that is so populate today.

Price

The cost of porcelain countertops is higher since they take longer to make and install. During the fabrication process, porcelain is a difficult material to work with. To guarantee beautiful edges, tight seams, and precise fit and finish, special methods must be employed.

Granite costs have decreased in recent years since they are no longer as popular, resulting in a cheaper slab.

While porcelain is not cheaper than granite, they can be more desirable because of the more popular designs and colors. Also, porcelain countertops do not ever need a sealer keeping them looking beautiful for years to come.

Conclusion

So, there you have it – porcelain countertops are not cheaper than granite. But they may be the right choice for you, depending on your needs and preferences. Talk to a countertop specialist today to learn more about porcelain and whether they are right for your home.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789 | valerie.olivemill@gmail.com | Contractor’s License #823217

MSI Stile Porcelain Countertop

Porcelain Countertop Cost: What You Need to Know

If you are looking for a new countertop, you may be interested in porcelain. But what are porcelain countertops? What factors into their cost? How much do they cost? In this blog post, we will explore porcelain countertop cost.

What are porcelain slab countertops?

Porcelain is made of a mineral called kaolinite. This mineral is mixed with other materials like feldspar, metal oxides, and silica to make porcelain. Porcelain often looks like other materials; for example, some companies manufacture porcelain that looks like marble.

Simply put, porcelain slabs are giant tiles like what used to come in a standard 4″ x 4″ dimension.

Pros and Cons

Many people love porcelain because it is exceptionally durable and beautiful. Porcelain is also considered to be very stain resistant because it does not absorb liquids.

In terms of chipping and scratching, it can resist most damage, but it is still possible. Porcelain shines when it comes to heat and UV resistance. It will not distort when subjected to high temperatures, making it an excellent choice for outdoor use in direct sunlight.

Porcelain comes in a variety of designs, colors, and sizes. You can find porcelain that looks like wood or stone. Some porcelain is even made to look like fabric. The possibilities are endless with porcelain!

What do porcelain slab countertops cost?

Porcelain countertop cost from $100 to $150 per square foot. For comparison’s sake, quartz is usually $70 to $100 per square foot.

The higher cost is due to the complicated manufacturing process. Specialized blades and slow cutting speeds are required for cutting the material. Extra precaution must be taken throughout the fabrication process to guarantee a beautiful end result with sharp edges and seams.

If you’re in the market for a new countertop and are considering porcelain, be sure to give us a call. We can provide you with an estimate for installation as well as answer any questions you may have about this beautiful and durable material.

 

For more information about your next countertop project, contact Valerie at Olive Mill.
Call or text (714) 528-3789  |  valerie.olivemill@gmail.com  |  Contractor’s License #823217

How to Clean Quartz Countertops

Quartz for Easy Care and Maintenance
Learning how to clean quartz surface countertops takes no time at all. Quartz countertop material is a tough, non-porous, chemically resistant, high-performance surface that elevates residential kitchen aesthetics with the natural beauty of quartz.

How to Clean Quartz Countertops — Routine Care

Just Use Water and a Paper Towel
Quartz surfacing material will retain its radiant, lustrous appearance for many years. For routine cleaning, simply wipe down your countertop with a damp cloth or paper towel and, if necessary, a small amount of non-bleach, non-abrasive cleanser.

Clean Up Spills Right Away — Before They Can Dry
Even though quartz resists permanent staining when exposed to liquids (such as wine, vinegar, tea, lemon juice and soda) or fruits and vegetables, you’ll want to wipe up food and liquid spills as soon as possible.

For stubborn or dried spills, use a nonabrasive cleaning pad such as a white 3M Scotch-Brite®* scrub pad coupled with Formula 409® Glass & Surface Cleaner** or a comparable cleaning product.

How to Clean Quartz Countertops — Essential Gear

Cutting Boards and Trivets
DuPont™ Corian® quartz surfaces are heat- and scratch-resistant, but not heat- and scratch-proof. Use trivets or pads with hot pots, and always use a cutting board. Never chop or slice food directly on your quartz countertops.

How to Clean Quartz Countertops — What Not to Use

  • No Wax or Polish Necessary – Because it is non-porous, quartz surface does not require sealants or waxes. Corian® keeps its lustrous gloss and ultra-smooth surface without polishing.
  • Do Not Use Bleach – Avoid using cleansers that contain bleach. Always follow the cleaner manufacturer’s use instructions and exercise proper care when handling and storing any cleaning products.
  • Avoid High-pH Cleaners – While casual exposure to alkaline materials will not damage Corian® quartz surfaces, highly alkaline (high-pH) cleansers are not recommended.
  • Heat Damage Prevention – Do not place hot skillets or roasting pans directly onto the surface. DuPont recommends the use of trivets and hot pads.
  • Dealing with More Difficult Spills and Materials – Materials that harden as they dry (such as gum, food, grease, nail polish or paint) are especially tenacious. Remove these by gently scraping away the excess with a plastic putty knife.
  • Permanent Markers – Keep permanent markers and inks away from your quartz countertops. Should these agents come into contact with the surface, clean first as outlined above in Routine Care. If the stain persists, moisten a cloth with Goo Gone®**, or a comparable product, and rub it into the stain. Rinse thoroughly with warm water to remove any cleaner residue.
  • Keep Solvents and Powerful Chemicals Off the Counter – Avoid exposing quartz surfaces to strong chemicals and solvents, especially paint removers or furniture strippers containing trichloroethane or methylene chloride. Keep nail polish remover, bleach, bluing, permanent markers or inks, and oil soaps away from quartz.

Removing Cooking Grease

When grease from cooking is an issue, use Greased Lightning™**, or a comparable degreasing product, to help loosen and remove the grease from the surface. Follow the cleaner manufacturer’s instructions for use.

If any of the substances listed above come into contact with quartz surfaces, rinse the exposed surface immediately and thoroughly with water.

Granite Countertops – Can They Burn?

Besides its stunning, long-lasting beauty, one of the top advantages of granite countertops is their durability. In fact, granite is one of the hardest materials on Earth. Natural stone is resistant to scratches, stains, and heat. One of the most frequent questions homeowners ask is: Can granite countertops burn? Granite Countertop – Can they burn?

The simple answer is no, granite as a natural porous stone will not burn. Because it began as a liquid magma deep within the Earth, and over millions of years is cooled and compressed, it has a natural resistance to heat damage.

Unlike other natural or synthetic products that require trivets to avoid marring their surface from hot pots and pans, heat does not damage these counters. Pots and pans heated to nine hundred degrees will not scorch their lustrous finish, and even a direct flame applied to its surface will not leave burnt or scarred marks.

However, the long answer is that, while it is safe to briefly set hot cookware directly on top of your countertops, there are considerations that may make use of a trivet or hot pad wise.

Epoxy Resin Sealants

If your slab has been treated with epoxy resin sealants, the epoxy may soften with exposure to high temperatures. However, according to Stone World, small cracks and fractures will not be affected, and any visible patches of epoxy glue will soon revert to their original state once the surface temperature cools.

Surface Sealers

If you have applied a topical sealer to your counters, check the product label for any warnings about interactions with heat and damage to the finish. Some sealants, especially those with a wax base, may burn and become difficult to remove.

Burns

Granite, especially darker varieties, retains heat. Placing a flame-hot pan directly onto a counter will heat the surface. If someone touches this spot immediately after the pan is moved, there is a risk of injury from burns. Because the stone’s color does not change when extremely hot, there is no warning that the surface could be potentially dangerous.

Staining

Placing a hot pan directly onto an improperly sealed countertop can result in oily stains if the bottom surface of the pan is dirty. While the pan may look clean to the naked eye, metals in the pan may react with the burner, causing a residue that may stain.

Thermal Shock

While a granite countertop will withstand hot cookware, it is smart to allow pots and pans to cool before placing them on the surface. When heat is applied to a cold surface, the rapid shift in molecules can cause cracks, and over time may compromise your counter’s integrity.

Always check with your fabricator to avoid damaging the granite. To be on the safe side, consider using trivets and hot pads to absorb heat, prevent stains and protect your investment.